National Center for Lesbian Rights

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lesbian immigration

In re S.H.

S.H. is a lesbian from Bosnia who came to the United States in 2006 to escape the oppressive and abusive conditions she faced because of her sexual orientation in her home country. While vacationing with her girlfriend in another town, a group of men found out that they were lesbians and raped them. The police initially took a report but later that night told the two women that they had to leave town. The police blamed the women for the assault and accused them of trying to cause problems in a...

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In re Angelica

Angelica was born in Mexico City to a family that raised her with the expectation that she would get married and have children. Her family was also extremely controlling and abusive. She was not permitted to participate in any activities outside of the home and was physically abused throughout her childhood. When a rumor spread at her school that she had been spotted kissing a girl, in addition to being terrified of her family’s reaction, Angelica began facing regular harassment and even...

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In re Monica

Monica, a native and citizen of Colombia, came to the United States under a student visa. While in the United States, Monica came out as a lesbian. As a student Monica flourished in the arts, especially film making. She became an activist in the LGBT, immigration, and women’s rights movements. Through film, she explores the issue of lesbian rights. Her documentaries include: “Latinas Lesbianas,” interviews with Latina immigrant lesbians who are activists on issues such as...

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In re Dina

Dina, a native and citizen of El Salvador, knew at a young age that she was a lesbian. She was rejected by her mother who constantly threatened to expose her sexual orientation to friends, coworkers, and employers. If exposed, Dina would risk being ostracized and abused on account of her sexual orientation. Dina paid her mother money to keep her silent. Living under this constant threat of exposure, Dina was pressured to marry a man. She hoped that her marriage would protect her from any...

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In re Shinegerel

In Mongolia, Shinegerel was arrested and detained by the Mongolian police because she is a lesbian. In custody, Shinegerel suffered severe physical abuse while being interrogated about her sexual orientation. She was also threatened with psychiatric hospitalization and imprisonment. NCLR represented Shinegerel at her asylum office interview. She was granted asylum by the San Francisco Asylum Office on March 15, 2005.

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